Best Things to Do on Gozo, Malta

Gozo Malta is slow-paced; fewer tourists make it to Malta’s ‘Little Sister.’ Away from the ferry terminal, traffic is light. Day-to-day life is regulated by the sea, seasons, and crops. A church bell and rooster announce the day’s beginning. Shops close for a mid-day break. At the end of the day, folks gather at sidewalk cafes, eating, drinking, laughing, conversing in English, Maltese, Italian, and bits of Arabic.

The fishing boats of Marsaxlokk…

It’s early morning. The sky is changing from deep indego to gold. The fishing boats of Marsaxlokk bob quietly in the harbor. Fisherman sit under a shelter drinking coffee and eating Maltese pastries. On a stripped bench, a deckhand catches a few winks. The conversations are mostly in Maltese, but I hear English, Italian, and a language I think might be an African dialect.

30 Days in Malta: Chapter 5

Malta has no rivers, lakes, or reservoirs. Water comes from the ocean, rain, or limited groundwater. Most potable water is desalinated sea water.

30-Days in Malta—Chapter 3

The Maltese are great cooks and renowned chefs. In the center of the Mediterranean, the best ingredients in the world are at Malta’s doorstep. Seafood from the Mediterranean Sea, fruit, veg and spices from Morocco, Greece, Italy, Spain, France, and the Middle East.